Campaigns We Support

Find out more about some of the campaigns we support by using the links below:

 

Vote Leave Watch

Following the outcome of the EU referendum, Usdaw is committed to ensuring that our members’ interests are protected during negotiations on Brexit.

One of the most urgent areas where we need guarantees from the Government is around workers’ rights. The Government has promised a ‘Great Repeal Bill’, which will transfer all EU law into UK law. However, this Act will not cover important Employment Rights decisions from the European Court of Justice such as the right to continue getting holiday leave whilst someone is ill.

Furthermore, any Repeal Act can be amended by future Conservative Governments, the same Conservatives who introduced Employment Tribunal Fees, reduced redundancy consultation rights and increased the time period for people to qualify for protection against unfair dismissal.

To ensure that the Government acts to keep the rights that are so important for Usdaw members please sign Vote Leave Watch’s petition today.
 

Domestic Violence in the Workplace Survey

This survey looks at how domestic violence can affect workers and what kinds of support are available in workplaces.

The aims of this study are to learn about how domestic violence is affecting workers while they are at work and to learn how often this happens in countries around the world.

Take the survey: http://uwo.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cRTwUR4Bsohlh9r

 

Campaigning against unfair changes to the State Pension Age imposed on women born in the 1950s.

Women face a sharp increase in the length of their working lives as the Government has increased their State Pension age.

The 1995 Pensions Act increased the state pension age for women
from 60 to 65 between April 2010 and 2020, to bring it in line with that of
men.

However, in 2011 the coalition Government accelerated the rise
in the women’s state pension age from April 2016 so that it reached 65 by November 2018, then rising to 66 by 2020.

Those women born in the 1950s have been the most affected, with some having to work for up to an extra six years, and being given little notice of these changes.

A campaign has been set up to challenge this decision. The Women Against State Pension Inequality (WASPI) campaign has now gained over 150,000 signatures to demand transitional arrangements to support the women most affected.

WASPI women are campaigning for ‘fair transitional arrangements’.
Whilst they are not against equalising the state pension age for men and women, they believe that the Government:

  • did not notify the affected women after initial changes were made in the Pensions Act 1995; and
  • then unfairly accelerated the increase to their State Pension age in the Pensions Act 2011.

To find out more visit:
www.waspi.co.uk
twitter.com/WASPI_Campaign


Become a Blood Donor

Why give blood? Donated blood is a lifeline for many people needing long-term treatments, not just in emergencies. Your blood's main components: red cells, plasma and platelets are vital for many different uses.

Not enough new donors are coming forward to provide the right mix of blood to match patients' needs and replace those who can’t donate any more. Help ensure that patients in the future have access to the blood they need, when they need it.

Find out more and register to become a blood donor: http://www.blood.co.uk
 

Become an Organ Donor

Transplants can save or greatly enhance the lives of other people. But this relies on donors and their families agreeing to donate their organ or tissue.

You can give your consent by:

Find out more at:
https://www.organdonation.nhs.uk

 

#iwill - National Campaign Promoting Youth Social Action 

The campaign aims to make involvement in social action part of life for more 10-20 year olds around the UK. Youth social action is defined as ‘young people taking practical action in the service of others to create positive change’ and includes activities such as campaigning, fundraising and volunteering.

Usdaw has pledged to encourage members to either take part in or support youth social action as a recognised route for personal development and to make a positive impact in communities.

We believe in the power of youth social action to get young people ready for the world of work and to play an active part in their communities.  We pledge to:

  • Encourage our members who are under 20 to take part in social action as a recognised route for personal development and to make a positive impact in communities.
  • Support our membership to take a leadership role in inspiring young people to contribute to society and to advocate the value of youth social action amongst our members' networks and other trade unionists.
  • Contact the employers we work with to encourage them to pledge their support for the campaign.
  • Communicate our support for the #iwill campaign through our communication channels.

Find out more at: http://www.iwill.org.uk

End discrimination in survivor pensions

70,000 people in the UK could miss out on an equal pension, just because they are in a lesbian or gay couple. A year ago, the UK government acknowledged this inequality in pensions, but still hasn’t done anything about it.

View the TUC briefing on survivor pensions.

The TUC is urging people to sign and share a petition, hosted by All Out, calling on the government to ensure that pension schemes give widowers, same-sex couples and civil partners equal survivor pensions:
https://go.allout.org/en/a/equal-pensions/

Robin Hood Tax

This tax on the financial sector has the power to raise hundreds of billions every year globally. It could give a vital boost to the NHS, our schools, and the fight against child poverty in the UK – as well as tackling poverty and climate change around the world.

Find out more at: http://robinhoodtax.org.uk
 

Violence Against Women and Girls

Usdaw is part of an international trade union coalition tackling violence against women and girls. Across the world, violence against women and girls is still widespread.

On average two women a week are killed by a male partner or former partner:

  • One in four women will suffer domestic violence in their lifetimes.
  • One in three teenage girls has experienced sexual violence from a partner.
  • One in two boys & one in three girls think it is ok sometimes to hit a woman or force her to have sex.

Men suffer violence too but patterns of violence against women are different from those against men. Globally, men are more likely to die as a result of armed conflict, violence by strangers and suicide, while women are more likely to die at the hands of someone close to them, including husbands and other intimate partners. Statistics show that women and girls are more likely to experience violence than men. The reasons for this are complex but deeply rooted harmful attitudes towards women as being inferior to men, as well as their unequal, economic and political position in many societies are well documented causes.

Violence can have a devastating impact on women and girls and can also affect women not directly involved. We know that many women in Usdaw are concerned about the threat of violence when they are at work and also when travelling to and from work. A recent Usdaw survey showed that women are twice as likely to feel unsafe on their journeys to and from work as men. And women feel at greater risk than men when driving alone at night, or travelling by bus or train when dark.

For women in many parts of the world, violence is a leading cause of injury and disability.

Violence affects women worldwide and action is needed both nationally and internationally to tackle it. Usdaw is part of an international trade union alliance taking action on this issue. Over two weeks in March, the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women is meeting in New York to discuss the way forward. Trade unions across the world are hoping the UN will agree concrete steps to help tackle violence against women and girls.

Usdaw's General Secretary John Hannett said:

"Women's safety whether at work, at home or in the community is a trade union issue and one that Usdaw has always taken seriously. We cannot hope to deliver equality for women without tackling gender based violence. Violence against women is preventable and I am committed to ensuring that Usdaw plays its full part in an international trade union coalition taking action on this issue."

Usdaw wants to see the UN and the UK Government focusing on:

  • Using the education system to prevent violence and to tackle the attitude that still exists in many societies that women are subordinate to men, or that men are entitled to use violence to control women.
  • Ensure funding for specialist violence against women and girls services to deliver prevention work.
  • Public awareness campaigns.
  • Tackle the sexualisation of women and girls in the media and popular culture.

You can find out more about this international trade union campaign at http://goo.gl/5RBT9 and you can lend your support by going to www.breakingthecircle.org

Workers' Memorial Day

Workers' Memorial Day is held on 28 April every year. All over the world workers and their representatives conduct events, demonstrations, vigils and a whole host of other activities to mark the day.

Workers’ Memorial Day is the day when the International Labour Movement remembers those who have been killed or injured in workplace accidents and those who have died from occupational diseases. The event started in North America in 1986 and has been supported by Usdaw since 1995. The Day is now a global event and is officially recognised by the International Labour Organisation (ILO) and by the International Trade Union Movement (ITUC).

This year the TUC is calling for Trade Unions across the country to make Workers' Memorial Day a day of action to defend health and safety.

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